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Yo! Sushi is coming to Boxpark but with one major difference to most branches

Yo! Sushi is coming to Boxpark but with one major difference to most branches
Apr 08, 2017 Shaking Hands 0 comments
This post was first published by Croydon Advertiser on 01/04/2017.

Yo! Sushi is coming to Boxpark but with one major difference to most branches

Yo! Sushi is opening a branch in Croydon’s Boxpark but those familiar with the Japanese restaurant chain will notice something is missing.

It will be going back to basics and ditching the conveyor belt, according to an advert for jobs at the new branch.

The company has applied to Croydon Council for a licence to operate, and serve alcohol, between 9am and 11pm, seven days a week.

The advert suggets that the branch will open in April.

 Yo! Sushi branches typically give diners the chance to pick dishes from a conveyor belt as they go past them, or order from the menu.

There are seven colours of plate, each indicating a different price, and when you’re done the plates are counted up to work out your bill.

Yo! Sushi first brought the traditional Japanese “kaiten” (conveyor belt) sushi to London in 1997. It now has more than 90 restaurants around the world.

But the advert says the branch won’t have the famous conveyor belt.

It explains: “We’re stripping back to basics and ditching the belt; focusing on Japanese sushi and street food, innovation, culture and provenance. Fish isn’t the only thing on the menu either.”

The job description adds that team members will be “dishing up our exciting new dishes” – so it looks like there will be offerings on the menu we might not have tried before.

Perhaps there will still be some firm sushi favourites, though.

At typical Yo! Sushi restaurants diners can opt for inari sushi – sweet parcels of soft beancurd filled with sticky rice.

There is also kaiso sushi – marinated seaweed with sumiso rice wrapped in nori.

Maki is always a popular sushi dish and it doesn’t have to include fish – you can choose cucumber or avocado wrapped in a rice and seaweed, or go for the tuna or salmon option.

There is a tako nigiri with octopus or salmon, mackerel, tuna or shrimp versions.

As the city of Osaka’s number one street food, maybe takoyaki might be on the menu – lightly battered dough balls with octopus, topped with mayo, bonito and more.

Other options on the usual Yo! Sushi menu include apple gyoza which are sweet and crispy dumplings filled with apple compote, served sizzling hot with salted miso caramel.

Tofu katzu curry was voted best vegan curry by the animal rights organisation PETA. It consists of crispy tofu with mild curry sauce, pickles and steamed rice.

Yo! Sushi currently has a branch in House of Fraser, in the Centrale shopping centre.

Boxpark opened at the end of October with an eclectic mix of eateries serving food from around the world, ranging from doughnuts to greek yogurt desserts and French crepes to Taiwanese, Sri Lankan, Brazilian and Guyanese food.

Cult brand Meatliquor has made a home there, as has The Breakfast Club.

And many small businesses have made themselves at home in the mall’s shipping container units.

Customers typically buy their food and drink from their chosen eatery and meet with friends at the long tables in the centre of the venue to eat together.

It will be going back to basics and ditching the conveyor belt, according to an advert for jobs at the new branch.

The company has applied to Croydon Council for a licence to operate, and serve alcohol, between 9am and 11pm, seven days a week.

The advert suggets that the branch will open in April.

Yo! Sushi branches typically give diners the chance to pick dishes from a conveyor belt as they go past them, or order from the menu.

There are seven colours of plate, each indicating a different price, and when you’re done the plates are counted up to work out your bill.

Yo! Sushi first brought the traditional Japanese “kaiten” (conveyor belt) sushi to London in 1997. It now has more than 90 restaurants around the world.

But the advert says the branch won’t have the famous conveyor belt.

It explains: “We’re stripping back to basics and ditching the belt; focusing on Japanese sushi and street food, innovation, culture and provenance. Fish isn’t the only thing on the menu either.”

The job description adds that team members will be “dishing up our exciting new dishes” – so it looks like there will be offerings on the menu we might not have tried before.

Perhaps there will still be some firm sushi favourites, though.

At typical Yo! Sushi restaurants diners can opt for inari sushi – sweet parcels of soft beancurd filled with sticky rice.

There is also kaiso sushi – marinated seaweed with sumiso rice wrapped in nori.

Maki is always a popular sushi dish and it doesn’t have to include fish – you can choose cucumber or avocado wrapped in a rice and seaweed, or go for the tuna or salmon option.

There is a tako nigiri with octopus or salmon, mackerel, tuna or shrimp versions.

As the city of Osaka’s number one street food, maybe takoyaki might be on the menu – lightly battered dough balls with octopus, topped with mayo, bonito and more.

Other options on the usual Yo! Sushi menu include apple gyoza which are sweet and crispy dumplings filled with apple compote, served sizzling hot with salted miso caramel.

Tofu katzu curry was voted best vegan curry by the animal rights organisation PETA. It consists of crispy tofu with mild curry sauce, pickles and steamed rice.

Boxpark opened at the end of October with an eclectic mix of eateries serving food from around the world, ranging from doughnuts to greek yogurt desserts and French crepes to Taiwanese, Sri Lankan, Brazilian and Guyanese food.

Cult brand Meatliquor has made a home there, as has The Breakfast Club.

And many small businesses have made themselves at home in the mall’s shipping container units.

Customers typically buy their food and drink from their chosen eatery and meet with friends at the long tables in the centre of the venue to eat together.

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